iamdiasporicX

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art practice*politics*theory*concept

Artist statement
For me the personal has always been in bed with the political. Questions and challenges arise from living in the Diaspora, and ones life has the capacity to canonize the art work from the mixture of personal and politics. My everyday practice as a product of this world, is to recognize myself for what I am, not what I have been ushered into believing about myself. And what I am is an unapologetic brown woman.

This Friday at Norwich University of the Arts I will be doing an artist talk.
The political history of hair in the Black & Latino communities, and how that ties to wider socio-economic issues and emerging art practice concerning the same themes.
There will be readings of poetry and speeches as well.
I will also be selling some zines and providing information on the artists I speak about if anyone wants to do further research.
I hope to see you there!

This Friday at Norwich University of the Arts I will be doing an artist talk.

The political history of hair in the Black & Latino communities, and how that ties to wider socio-economic issues and emerging art practice concerning the same themes.

There will be readings of poetry and speeches as well.

I will also be selling some zines and providing information on the artists I speak about if anyone wants to do further research.

I hope to see you there!

— 7 minutes ago with 1 note
#my work  #artist talk  #norwich  #norwich univeristy of the arts  #NUA  #BHM  #black art  #latina art  #hair 

hecallsmepineappleprincess:

offside-goal:

icedoutdiamonds:

This is amazing!

I will never get over the fact that Rajah was replaced with Simba it’s so cute

I love them all

(Source: el-diario-de-una-adolescente, via inthepalmofme)

— 1 day ago with 172988 notes
dawnieofanewday:

micdotcom:

Ebola fear is turning into all-out racism

The American public’s reaction to the Ebola virus outbreak that’s killed over 4,000 people has moved from concern to outright xenophobia
Call it “Ebola racism.” With the death of Liberian Thomas E.Duncan at a Dallas hospital last week and news that two nurses who treated him have contracted the deadly illness, increasingly paranoid Americans are treating immigrants and visitors from Ebola-ravaged countries like Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone like lepers. 
"People, once they know you are Liberian — people assume you have the virus in your body." | Follow micdotcom


And I’m not surprised

dawnieofanewday:

micdotcom:

Ebola fear is turning into all-out racism

The American public’s reaction to the Ebola virus outbreak that’s killed over 4,000 people has moved from concern to outright xenophobia

Call it “Ebola racism.” With the death of Liberian Thomas E.Duncan at a Dallas hospital last week and news that two nurses who treated him have contracted the deadly illness, increasingly paranoid Americans are treating immigrants and visitors from Ebola-ravaged countries like Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone like lepers. 

"People, once they know you are Liberian — people assume you have the virus in your body." | Follow micdotcom

And I’m not surprised

(via black-culture)

— 1 day ago with 5931 notes
mayhem-is-hand-wash-only:

diamond-sound:

eridans-bullshit-magic:

super-galaxy-gurren-lagann:

just in case you somehow forgot how horrible the pro life movement is

if people have the right to the hospital then i have the right to  critically wound them

If people have the right to education then I have the right to give them brain damage

If people have the right to speak freely then I have the right to silence them permanently.

mayhem-is-hand-wash-only:

diamond-sound:

eridans-bullshit-magic:

super-galaxy-gurren-lagann:

just in case you somehow forgot how horrible the pro life movement is

if people have the right to the hospital then i have the right to  critically wound them

If people have the right to education then I have the right to give them brain damage

If people have the right to speak freely then I have the right to silence them permanently.

(Source: iliketoeatsalamanders, via inthepalmofme)

— 3 days ago with 417634 notes

samanticshift:

male cashier: you’re too pretty to be wearing all that eye makeup.

me: you’re too irrelevant to be commenting on my appearance.

(via inthepalmofme)

— 3 days ago with 9139 notes
http://shmurdapunk.tumblr.com/post/100108155519/dear-white-people-is-hitting-theatres-this-friday →

shmurdapunk:

Dear White People is hitting theatres this friday and of course, just like since the movie was announced, I’m seeing all these “What if there was a Dear Black People…” comments

What if there was?

What about your whiteness, about the white experience, do you actually think that black people…

— 3 days ago with 1842 notes

It stops before she delivers her last couple of words.


'If you're that hypersensitive about color and don't have a sense of humor don't marry out of your race.'

Articles y videos

http://jezebel.com/5612060/dr-laura-apologizes-for-n-word-but-shes-still-a-racist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ve83qvVG7s4

— 4 days ago with 1 note
#racism  #n word 
"See. This the shit I’m talkin ‘bout."
A nigga who is being annoyed with a reoccurring situation (via kingsxoqueens)

(Source: thehannahmumford, via tontonmichel)

— 4 days ago with 14818 notes

5centsapound:

Kerry James Marshall

*click on images to see all the details and historical references in each painting…

via mousse:

To what extent has our imaginary been colonized by stereotypical scenes, from art history and the world of media, whose protagonists are Caucasian figures? Might this not be both the cause and effect of our acute perception of “otherness,” with its wealth of negative implications? Kerry James Marshall, in his wide-ranging pictorial research, analyzes the condition of images, coming to terms with art history, contemporary icons and the dictatorship of an iconographic imaginary that is intrinsically discriminatory, showing how art can become a tool of reappropriation and expansion of our collective unconscious.

Through his practice, Marshall tackles what he has referred to as “the lack in the image bank.” He looks at images generated across a broad range of spheres—society, culture, art—and responds dialogically with a new body of images made from a variety of counter-perspectives. 

We tend to assume there is one history of America: the mythical, heroic narrative of an all-inclusive, grand project that had at its inception the goal of embracing differences and treating all as equal. If we allow ourselves to be lost in this mythology, we overlook the more disturbing, less humane dimensions of our history. We don’t always learn that our nation’s triumphs were at times achieved on the backs of other people. Everyone should have both of these complicated narratives always in their consciousness. 

[…] People ask me why my figures have to be so black. There are a lot of reasons. First, the blackness is a rhetorical device. When we talk about ourselves as a people and as a culture, we talk about black history, black culture, black music. That’s the rhetorical position we occupy. Somebody has to start representing that blackness in the extreme and letting it be beautiful. 
- via artinamerica

Marshall’s understanding of society’s image bank casts it as a sort of empire—something that yields great currency and great powers of discrimination, and serves to impose and normalize ideals. The flow of “traffic” occurs in one direction only, meaning that individuals have relatively little control over, or ownership of, what they see. His ambition is to demonstrate that we can make images our own: reclaim and adapt them, and create new ones that represent the individual realities we actually exist in. Marshall wishes, in a sense, for us to understand the instability of images, and how art offers a special license to appropriate, change, create, and interpret them, then push them back into the public sphere. The sense of ownership he creates through his style of image making is something that should be considered progressive—necessary, even. It is a more inclusive, perhaps even communitarian, understanding of the role of representation as aiming to counter the massive hegemony of images by expanding the repertoire of our collective unconscious. 

For example in Great America (1994),  Marshall re-imagines a boat ride through the haunted tunnel of an amusement park as the Middle Passage of slaves from Africa to the New World. The dominant theme of these works is the transport of African slaves to America in the Middle Passage—the second or “middle” leg of the triangular trade of manufactured goods, slaves, and crops that transpired between Europe, Africa, and the American colonies from the colonial period until the middle of the 19th century. Marshall’s works explore the economic, sociological, and psychological aftermath of this foundational episode of US history. In his art, the past is never truly past: history exerts a constant, often unconscious pressure on the living.

(via handtracings)

— 4 days ago with 1812 notes
The Semiotics of Race, or: Walks on the Wild Side

Semiotics is fundamentally the study of sign-systems. A sign-system has two parts: the signifier (the thing we see), and the signified (what we think of when we see it). Non-white skin is part of a sign-system, where one’s skin-colour is the signifier and what is signified is wildness, savagery, and animalism. Non-whiteness, in the minds of white people, signifies what is lacking: a lack of enlightenment; of respectability; of culture. It signifies danger: danger to white values; to white norms; the danger of a square peg refusing to fit into a round hole. Mostly, it signifies other: them, not us.

The implications extend far beyond the academic. We have ideas–ideas absorbed through pop culture, by those who raised us; ideas we believe without even knowing we believe them–about what whiteness and non-whiteness mean, ideas that extend far beyond the dictionary definitions of those terms. We do not have a single race-based interaction that does not come with this semiotic baggage.

As a brown woman of mixed racial heritage, I encounter this baggage regularly, and I encounter it everywhere. Brown skin means alternately something exotic, a rarity to be sampled before returning to plainer fare, or something dangerous: the potential for fanaticism, a hair-trigger temper, a body rigged to explode. I have seen the way this shapes people’s interactions with me. I have been eyed warily or curiously or both, in stores while trying to do some shopping, in clubs whilst trying to dance with friends, on the street whilst running errands, or catching the bus home after work. I’m a curiosity, a novelty, a rarity, an exotic import from the monolithic East. I’ve been called an Arab princess (not Arab!) an exotic Indian (not Indian!), and an Afghani terrorist (not Afghani, either!). My skin is a signifier that points to not fitting in, to not belonging, to otherness and strangeness and the danger of the unknown.

I have seen, also, the way skin colour is used as leverage within PoC communities to recreate and reify the hierarchies of white society within our own spaces. The colourism and misogynoir so many darker-skinned WoC experience is directly tied to the semiotic association between dark skin and mindless savagery. Dark-skinned women are shunned and mistreated even by dark-skinned men, their lighter-skinned sisters praised and glorified as though the association with whiteness makes them somehow better–better wives, better girlfriends, better mothers, better professionals, better attitudes, better women.

-excerpt from

www.blackgirldangerous.org/2014/04/semiotics-race-walks-wild-side/

— 4 days ago with 1 note
#black girl dangerous  #antiblackness  #racism  #white supremacy 
Teacher fired while defending black student from bullying →

(Source: jessehimself)

— 5 days ago with 158 notes
#institutional racism